[Home]History of Wi' Nae Wee Bairn Ye'll Me Beget


Revision 9 . . (edit) 2007-6-1 9:50 am by DavidJennings
Revision 8 . . 2007-6-1 9:32 am by DavidJennings [Added ref to Two Magicians (thanks to Oliver for pointing this out)]
Revision 7 . . (edit) 2007-5-22 1:14 pm by DavidJennings [Added link to film]
Revision 6 . . (edit) 2006-7-11 1:23 am by DavidJennings
  

Difference (from prior major revision) (minor diff, author diff)

Changed: 5c5
For anyone unfamiliar with Scottish dialect, 'Wi' Nae Wee Bairn Ye'll Me Beget' translates as 'With no small child you will me beget (i.e. sire)'. The 'shape-shifting' theme of the lyric ('Well I'll turn into a...') is common to many folk traditions. A widely known instance (since Disney did a [film] of it) is the shapechanging battle between Madam Mym and Merlin in T H White's The Sword in the Stone.
For anyone unfamiliar with Scottish dialect, 'Wi' Nae Wee Bairn Ye'll Me Beget' translates as 'With no small child you will me beget (i.e. sire)'. The 'shape-shifting' theme of the lyric ('Well I'll turn into a...') is common to many folk traditions. A widely known instance (since Disney did a [film] of it) is the shapechanging battle between Madam Mym and Merlin in T H White's The Sword in the Stone.

Changed: 7c7,14
The 'little ee' and 'a maiden I will dee' (i.e. die) lines may be true to the phonetic spirit of many Scots ballads, but stretch the 'letter' of dialect pronounciation.
Another is the song [Two Magicians], one of the [Child Ballads], recorded by Steeleye Span among others, which also shares the theme of a maiden protecting her virginity, and from which Wi' Nae Wee Bairn Ye'll Me Beget appears to be derived:

You never shall have my maidenhead

That I have kept so long!

I'd rather die a maid, aye, and then she said,

And be buried all in my grave


In Wi' Nae Wee Bairn Ye'll Me Beget, the 'little ee' and 'a maiden I will dee' (i.e. die) lines may be true to the phonetic spirit of many Scots ballads, but stretch the 'letter' of dialect pronounciation.